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Sunday, May 3, 2020 | History

3 edition of What I need to know about Hepatitis A found in the catalog.

What I need to know about Hepatitis A

What I need to know about Hepatitis A

  • 156 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Nattional Institutes of Health, National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse in Bethesda, Md .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hepatitis A -- United States,
  • Hepatitis A virus -- United States

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesNIH publication -- no. 00-4244
    ContributionsNational Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination10 p. :
    Number of Pages10
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14510673M
    OCLC/WorldCa44523574


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What I need to know about Hepatitis A Download PDF EPUB FB2

Hepatitis can be incurred as a complication of several other disorders in addition to viral infection, among them amebic dysentery, cirrhosis of the liver, and mononucleosis. Also, alcohol, carbon tetrachloride, some tranquilizers and antibiotics, and many other substances can produce a toxic reaction in the liver.

Other types of hepatitis exist. The National Institutes of Health has also provided additional publications about Hepatitis A – “What I Need to Know About Hepatitis A” – Publication No. – and Hepatitis B – “What I Need to Know About Hepatitis B” – Publication No. Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

What I need to know about Hepatitis A. Bethesda, Md.: Nattional Institutes of Health, National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse, [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (U.S.

How is hepatitis A treated. Usually you will be treated at home. Medicine may not be needed. If you vomit a lot, you may need to go to the hospital to get fluids through an IV.

Rest and healthy food will help you get better. What can I do to manage hepatitis A. Eat a variety of healthy foods.

Hepatitis A vaccine is an inactivated (killed) vaccine. You will need 2 doses for long-lasting protection. These doses should be given at least 6 months apart. Although hepatitis A vaccine is recommended for all children in the United States at age 1 year (i.e., 12–23 months) and high-risk adults, evacuation itself is not a specific indication for hepatitis A vaccination of previously unvaccinated children or adults unless exposure to hepatitis.

Hepatitis A is a highly contagious liver infection caused by a virus. Learn more about the symptoms, causes, diagnosis, treatment, and vaccine for hepatitis A. Hepatitis A is a virus found in the stool (faeces) of people with hepatitis A (HAV) infection.

Here is all about hepatitis A you must know. Hepatitis A is a viral liver ailment that can lead to. The cause of hepatitis A is hepatitis A virus; it can be transmitted to others by contaminated stools (feces), foods prepared by an infected person, contaminated water, and close personal contact (for example, touching hands, sex) with an infected person, but not by sneezing, cough, hugging (without skin contact).

Did you know that hepatitis viruses are the most common cause of hepatitis in the world. You might be thinking, “I’m not even % of what hepatitis is.” It’s inflammation of the liver. It can be short-term in some cases or lead to chronic infection and disease in others.

What I need to know about Hepatitis A. Bethesda, Md.: National Institutes of Health, National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse, [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (U.S.

Hepatitis A characteristically is an acute, self-limited illness associated with fever, malaise, jaundice, anorexia, and nausea. Symptomatic hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection occurs in approximately 30% of infected children younger than 6 years; few of these children will have jaundice.

Hepatitis B and C are usually spread through infected blood or other bodily fluids. Doctors, dentists, and nurses, as well as staff and patients at blood banks, dialysis clinics, and pathology laboratories, are at a greater risk of developing these kinds of hepatitis due to accidental blood exposure.

In book: B Positive: All you wanted to know about hepatitis B. A guide for primary care providers, Edition: second, Chapter: Chapter 9: Hepatitis B related hepatocellular carcinoma, Publisher. What I need to know about Hepatitis A book Hepatitis A is an acute or short-term infection, which means people usually get better without treatment after a few weeks.

In rare cases, hepatitis A can be severe and lead to liver failure and the need for an emergency liver transplant to survive.

Hepatitis A and B are serious diseases with a widespread and predominantly overlapping epidemiological distribution [1, 2].Hepatitis B is a major global health problem and is the tenth-leading cause of mortality in the world, responsible for ,– million deaths per by:   Persons over the age of 50, those with chronic liver disease, and immunocompromised individuals who have not been vaccinated against hepatitis A remain most at risk for developing fulminant hepatitis, a rare but devastating complication of a hepatitis A infection that can lead to the need for a liver transplant, or death.

Hepatitis A is inflammation of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus. This highly contagious form of hepatitis can be spread through contaminated Author: April Kahn. Another booster dose of hepatitis A vaccine after 20 years can be given to those people still at risk of infection. The doses of the combined vaccines against both hepatitis A and hepatitis B or hepatitis A and typhoid may need to be given at slightly different time intervals.

Your doctor or practice nurse will be able to advise you in : Dr Colin Tidy. Hepatitis A is an infectious disease of the liver caused by Hepatovirus A (HAV). Many cases have few or no symptoms, especially in the young. The time between infection and symptoms, in those who develop them, is between two and six weeks.

When symptoms occur, they typically last eight weeks and may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, jaundice, fever, and abdominal : Eating food or drinking water contaminated with. If you need to be vaccinated before your trip, you may need to travel some distance and schedule your appointment well in advance.

Find the clinic nearest you. Most travelers. Get travel vaccines and medicines because there is a risk of these diseases in the country you are visiting. Hepatitis A. Newborns with HCV-positive mothers, people living with HIV and healthcare professionals handling contaminated instruments are more prone to get infected with Hepatitis C virus.

Do you know more than million people around the world live with Hepatitis C virus but most of them do not know that they have been infected because of a simple. More thanCanadians are believed to be infected with hepatitis C, but 40 to 70 per cent are unaware they harbour the blood-borne virus because it.

Buy Dr. Melissa Palmer's Guide to Hepatitis & Liver Disease: What You Need to Know Revised ed. by Palmer, Melissa (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(32). What I need to know about Hepatitis A Author: NDDIC Subject: Explains the risk factors, modes of transmission, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of hepatitis A.

Also available in Spanish \(DD \). Keywords: Digestive System Diseases. Liver Diseases. Hepatitis A. Liver. Human Viral Hepatitis.

Risk Factors. Symptoms. Jaundice. Healthy people 12 months of age and over receive two doses of hepatitis A vaccine, or three doses if the hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines are given as a combination.

If your vaccine course is complete, you do not need a booster dose of hepatitis A vaccine. You can complete any missed vaccine doses, even if the recommended time frame has passed. Living With Hepatitis C: Everything You Need to Know (Your Personal Health) by Jenny Heathcote, et al.

This is a very succinct and thorough guide to hepatitis C. It describes everything an HCV-positive individual needs to know about hepatitis C, from prevention to treatment. It contains case studies, illustrations, and an excellent resource guide/5(2).

A combination hepatitis A/typhoid (ViCPS) vaccine, administered as a single dose, confers high levels of protection against both these waterborne diseases. A combination vaccine that provides protection against both hepatitis A and hepatitis B should be considered for travellers who may be exposed to both organisms (see under Hepatitis B vaccines).

If you have hepatitis B virus (HCV), the ADA provides some protection in the workplace, but there are limits to what it does. You cannot be terminated from employment solely because of having hepatitis B.

A hepatitis B diagnosis is not an automatic disability. What You Need To Know About Hepatitis A 2 Wants To Know is digging deeper into how Hepatitis A could affect you and your family.

Author: Erica Stapleton. HEPATITIS AND DENTAL PROFESSIONALS. In a dental office, infections can be expedited through several routes, including direct contact with blood, oral fluids, or other secretions; indirect contact with contaminated instruments, operatory equipment, or environmental surroundings; or contact with airborne contaminants present in either droplet splatter or aerosols of oral and respiratory Cited by: 5.

Hepatitis A can have serious (but short-lived) symptoms and people generally make a full recovery. Like hepatitis B and C, hepatitis A is a virus that affects the liver.

However, unlike hepatitis B and C, it is transmitted by ingesting infected faeces (poo). Extra doses of the vaccine are often recommended after 6 to 12 months if you need long-term protection. You can find more information about the various hepatitis A vaccines on the NHS Fit for Travel website.

Side effects of the hepatitis A vaccine. Some people have temporary soreness, redness and hardening of the skin at the injection site. In some severe cases, the Hepatitis C patients will need to have a liver transplant.

Most of the time, complications occur as a result of chronic Hepatitis C. The sooner you can get a diagnosis for chronic Hepatitis C, the sooner you should start your treatment so that you don’t have to experience the full-blown complications.

Hepatitis C. Hepatitis B vaccination is routinely available as part of the NHS vaccination 's offered to all babies at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age.

It's also offered to those thought to be at increased risk of hepatitis B or its complications. The vaccine gives protection against the hepatitis B virus, which is a major cause of serious liver disease, including scarring of the liver (cirrhosis. Hepatitis A -- children (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish; Hepatitis A and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent It (American Academy of Family Physicians, American Academy of Pediatrics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) - PDF; Hepatitis A Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) - PDF Also in Spanish.

In the United States, hepatitis C is the most common chronic viral infection found in blood and spread through contact with blood. Researchers estimate that about million to million people in the United States have chronic hepatitis C. 13 Many people who have hepatitis C don’t have symptoms and don’t know they have this.

Within 12 hours of birth, infants born to mothers with hepatitis B need to receive treatment with hepatitis B antibody and hepatitis B vaccine. This can prevent transmission of hepatitis B from mother to the baby. A person can get hepatitis C from: Sharing dirty needles.

Being in direct contact with infected blood. Getting needle stick injuries. What you need to know about preventing hepatitis B The hep B vaccine is the ideal way to prevent contracting the infection. To avoid spreading and getting the virus you must: • Use protection when you have sex • Wear gloves if you have to touch blood • Don’t share needles or personal care itemsAuthor: Nikita Sawant.

Henry Ford Hospital infectious diseases physician Dr. Katherine Reyes, M.D., MPH, says vaccination is best way to protect you against hepatitis A. Hepatitis C, a contagious, viral infection causes liver inflammation. Sometimes it also causes serious damage to the liver.

This blood-borne disease is caused by the Hepatitis C virus, and it is very common in the U.S.; with around million people affected by this disease. Let us find out more about this disease.tell you that you need a transplant, you should talk with them about the long-term demands of living with a liver transplant.

A team of surgeons—doctors who specialize in surgery—performs a liver transplant in a hospital. What I need to know about Hepatitis B.This test is called a hepatitis C viral load test (or RNA test).

If this test is positive, you have chronic hepatitis C and should talk to your provider about treatment. You do not need a liver biopsy to determine if you have hepatitis C. For more details about these tests, go to Understanding Lab Tests.